GS&P’s Srinivas Jalla Presents at Georgia Association of Water Professionals Conference

Senior Vice President Discusses Innovative Membrane Cleaning to Optimize Performance

August 08, 2017   |   Atlanta,  Ga.   |   Events

Gresham, Smith and Partners announces that Srinivas Jalla, P.E., PMP, a senior vice president in the firm’s Water and Environment market, presented at the 2017 Georgia Association of Water Professionals (GAWP) Conference and Expo in Savannah, Georgia on July 19. Jalla joined Robert Harris, P.E., from the Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources (GCDWR), to discuss the innovative recovery cleaning protocol developed to remove inorganic iron fouling from the membrane filtration system at the F. Wayne Hill Water Resource Center.

“Developing an effective cleaning protocol was critical to extending the useful life and restoring membrane filtration capacity,” commented Jalla. “I enjoyed sharing a case study on how the Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources helped advance our understanding of immersed hollow-fiber membranes at this year’s GAWP Conference. The conference provided a great opportunity to share knowledge and drive discussions relative to the advancement of smart, sustainable practices for building a water utility of the future.”

A summary of the presentation follows.

Innovative Membrane Cleaning to Remove Iron Fouling and Restore Permeability
Presentation by Robert Harris, P.E., Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources, and Srinivas Jalla, P.E., PMP, Gresham, Smith and Partners
 
Gwinnett County, Ga., owns and operates the F. Wayne Hill Water Resource Center, which is permitted to produce 60 million gallons a day (mgd) of high quality reclaimed water. The plant includes a 48 mgd submerged ultrafiltration (UF) membrane system that has been operational since 2005.  Ferric Chloride is used to reduce total phosphorus concentration to less than 0.08 mg/L to meet water quality goals for Lake Lanier, metro Atlanta’s drinking water source. The addition of ferric contributed to membrane fouling, which significantly reduced membrane permeability and affected system’s production capacity.  Increasing the frequency of maintenance and recovery cleans using manufacturer recommended protocols weren’t effective in improving system performance.

Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources (GCDWR) funded various studies to perform membrane fiber autopsies, investigate various chemical formulations, perform bench-scale tests and perform full-scale demonstration trials to develop an innovative enhanced recovery cleaning (ERC) protocol to remove organic and inorganic fouling.  In this presentation, Harris and Jalla discuss the results of the enhanced recovery cleaning protocol after one year of implementation and how the patent pending ERC protocol allowed GCDWR to reduce cleaning chemical costs and delay the capital cost of replacing the existing membranes. 

“I enjoyed sharing a case study on how the Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources helped advance our understanding of immersed hollow-fiber membranes at this year’s GAWP Conference. The conference provided a great opportunity to share knowledge and drive discussions relative to the advancement of smart, sustainable practices for building a water utility of the future.”

Srinivas Jalla, P.E., PMP, senior vice president, GS&P
Share This Page: