GS&P’s Jon Henney Moderates Panel on Historic Landscape Design and Management

Senior Landscape Architect Led Discussion at Louisville Workshop

February 15, 2017   |   Louisville,  Ky.   |   Events

Gresham, Smith and Partners announces that Senior Landscape Architect Jon Henney, ASLA, PLA, AICP-CUD, moderated a panel for landowners on historic landscape design and management at the Louisville and Jefferson County Environmental Trust’s sustainable landscape management workshop. The session, entitled “Historic Landscapes Design and Management – Respecting Those Who Came Before,” took place on Saturday, February 4, at Locust Grove. Panelists included Executive Director of Locust Grove, Carol Ely, Louisville Metro Parks and Recreation Landscape Architect, John Swintosky, PLA, ASLA, and Lower Howards Creek Nature and Heritage Preserve Manager, Clare Sipple. 

“The diverse range of issues brought forward by the panel really emphasized the complexity of historic landscape preservation,” commented Henney. “It’s important that we continue this dialogue to understand how best to manage the sites that we value. I hope that listeners took away some ideas about how they can actively manage the historic landscapes under their care.”
 
Details of the workshop are as follows:
 
“Historic Landscapes Design and Management – Respecting Those Who Came Before
 
Kentucky and Louisville have their share of invasive plants which are evident essentially anywhere there is a patch of dirt – parks, school yards, street and highway rights-of-way, private yards and vacant lots. Such infestations of invasive plants and animals can negatively affect property values, agricultural productivity, water quality, public utility operations, tourism, outdoor recreation and the overall health of ecosystems. Panelists will take a look at the problem and describe how various agencies, nonprofit organizations and individuals are addressing the issue.

The “Historic Landscapes Design and Management – Respecting Those Who Came Before” panel discussed the scope of historic landscape preservation and its context within the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for Historic Properties. Application of these principles was then discussed through three cases studies: The historic landscape of Louisville’s Locust Grove Mansion; discovering, preserving and enhancing historic landscapes in Louisville’s Olmsted Parks; and restoring historic roads and industrial and residential sites within the Lower Howards Creek Nature and Heritage Center. Practical considerations for how landowners might apply these lessons to their own sites, as well as ways to help the ongoing work in public parks and preserves were also discussed.
 

“The diverse range of issues brought forward by the panel really emphasized the complexity of historic landscape preservation. It’s important that we continue this dialogue to understand how best to manage the sites that we value.”

Jon Henney, ASLA, PLA, AICP-UD, Senior Landscape Architect, Gresham, Smith and Partners
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